Welcome to #LTYM San Antonio!

Meet the cast! 

Meet the 2017 Cast of Listen to Your Mother San Antonio Part 3

by jillr on April 12, 2017

Listen to Your Mother San Antonio announced it’s 2017 cast last month. Today, we’re going to introduce you to FOUR of the readers that will be sharing their stories on May 13th at the Carver Community Cultural Center.

Meet the Cast Part 3

As you can see from their biographies, they’re diverse and accomplished. Their stories are powerful, heartwarming, and entertaining. We can’t wait to share them with you.

If you’re not clear on what exactly Listen to Your Mother is, it’s a 90-minute stage show that takes you on a well-crafted journey that celebrates and validates mothering through giving voice to motherhood–in all its complexity, diversity, and humor.

Tickets are on sale now! follow Advance tickets are $15, $20.00 at the door on show day.

All tickets purchased online will incur Ticketmaster fees. You can purchase no-fee tickets at the Carver Community Cultural Center’s box office from 8-5 Monday through Friday, 226 North Hackberry, San Antonio TX 78202

LISTEN TO YOUR MOTHER aims to support motherhood creatively through artistic expression, and financially through contributions to non-profit organizations supporting families in need. Each LTYM show donates a minimum of 10% of ticket proceeds to a local cause, as well as providing the cause awareness/fund-raising opportunities. Our 2017 show is pleased to support Clarity Child Guidance Center of San Antonio.

This is the third in a series of posts that introduces our 2017 San Antonio Cast. If you missed the first, you can read them HERE and HERE.

Colleen Pence

Colleen

Colleen Pence began blogging in 2005 when she became hopelessly bored after her newborn daughter proved to be the easiest baby on the planet, taking five-hour-naps during the day and sleeping 10-hour stretches at night. But, don’t worry. Right before she smugly announced to the world that motherhood is an effortless gig, fate smote her down with a second baby who never slept.

She attributes her love of writing to a particularly passionate English teacher she met while in the eighth grade. Mr. Dade Wall taught Colleen the beauty, precision, and addictive high of diagramming sentences and the power and excitement experienced when carefully constructed language leaves a meaningful and lasting impression on the reader.

Her current blog is San Antonio Mom Blogs where she shares free and family-friendly things to do in San Antonio, along with the occasional personal anecdote intended to make you crycringe, or laugh out loud.

Dee Ramdass

Dee

Dee Ramdass is a newly published poet, who lives in San Antonio with her family and many adopted pets. Having grown up in a tropical rainforest with the warm ocean nearby, her writing is inspired by her childhood, her cross-cultural struggles, and her love of nature, plants, animals, underdogs. While she has been writing poetry all her life, she only recently began submitting them to publishers. Many of her poems have been featured in the GNU Literary Journal.

In her other career, she has been a nurse for over thirty years. She started as a Nurse’s Aide in high school, then became an LVN, RN, and NP by attending school while working full time. She earned her BSN and MSN at UTMB.

Michelle De La Garza

Michelle D.

Michelle De La Garza writes sweet YA/NA under her own name as well as adult fiction (steamy) under pseudonym April A. Luna. She is an American freelance writer, poet, and scriptwriter who lives with her husband and children in Texas.

Inspired by the works of Rice, Patterson, King, and Koontz, Michelle started writing fiction during the spring of 2013, and her first novel, Truth or Consequences (an April A. Luna book) was published by Soul Mate Publishing 2014. She went on to publish several more bodies of work under April A. Luna: Child of the Night, Sweeter than Candy, Kensington Cove: Call of the Night Box Set, and under Michelle L. De La Garza, she has the following books: The Lost Chronicles of the 4th World, The Lost Chronicles of the 5th World, and a poetry book titled Shadows of Thought: A Writing Collection.

Summer of 2017, Michelle will complete an MFA in Creative Writing (National University) with a major focus in fiction and scriptwriting, and a minor in poetry. She also holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Business Finance/Management with an emphasis in HRMs, and she teaches writing workshops and classes through NEISD’s Adult Continued Education, the San Antonio Tobin Library Branch, and online. Also, she runs the Tobin Writers’ Group, which meets twice a month at the San Antonio Tobin Library Branch.

Georgia Erck

Georgia

I’m Georgia, but my dad has always called me George, so now everybody else does, too. When I was in third grade at Woodridge Elementary, my mom read one of my school papers I brought home and said, “Someday, you’re going to be a really good writer.” I don’t know if this was a blessing or a curse, but I believed her. When I brought permission slips home, she always wrote, “Playwright” as her job, even though I told her Mrs. Wilson said to put “Housewife” if your mom just stayed at home all day. My mom took a lot of naps, but she was the best writer I knew. She had a play produced and articles published. Whenever she entered a writing contest, she won. She wrote to Thornton Wilder in college, asking him a question about his novel, The Eighth Day. He wrote back, and they became life-long pen pals. He and his sister, Isabel, even sent me gingerbread houses every Christmas, which all the neighborhood kids and I promptly gobbled up. She wrote to Orson Welles, Edward Kennedy, other famous people, and they always wrote back. I thought this was a given and was devastated when my letter to Fonzie from Happy Days went unanswered.

My dad recognized my mother’s talent, too, but bullied her. “Send that shit in, Phyl!” as if writing were something you just manufactured, poured words out of can like Campbell’s Soup. She got stuck. My dad had an odd way of encouraging her. “All that talent just sitting in the bottom drawer,” he would say when he was trying to motivate her. She knew writing was her purpose, but she never got unstuck.

Over the years, I talked to my mom almost every single day. In college, she wrote me beautiful letters, mostly just about what Mr. Rivas was watering in our backyard that day or what procedure my dad had done on someone’s tooth. My roommates and college friends would ask, “Did you get a letter from your mom today? Can we read it?” Even they recognized her gift of making everyday moments beautiful and memorable with just the right words.

I got married at 22, and when my kids brought home permission slips and medical forms, I found myself writing “Housewife” on the blank, when I really knew it should be “Writer.” I couldn’t put “Writer” unless I’d earned it, though. I hadn’t been published or “sent that shit in.” I focused on the kids but promised myself I would write my book because I knew writing was what I was meant to do.

I kept my promise. I have just completed the manuscript of a memoir, Shocking Happy, which poses the question, “On your journey through life, do you get to pack your own bags, or have your parents already done it for you?” I am a former Mentee in the Gemini Ink Mentorship Program and won Pitchapalooza at the San Antonio Book Festival in 2015.  I send my stories to my daughter, and she said her friends always ask if they can read them. Now when I see them they ask “Have you written any new stories for us to read? When will your book be published?” It is both a blessing and a curse.

I think a lot about what we learn as kids from our parents that shapes us into the adults we become and how the things we don’t want to keep are hard to unlearn. I’m also interested in the cycle, how we eventually switch and become the parents, and our parents become the children, if we live long enough.

Before my mom died, she said, “Here’s what you can do for me. Get it down. Write the book. That’s what you can do for me.” My goal is simple; keep going.  Writing is like driving through the mud.  If you stop in the middle, you’ll get stuck.  But if you make it through to the end, the curse finally becomes the blessing.

All tickets purchased online will incur Ticketmaster fees. You can purchase no-fee tickets at the Carver Community Cultural Center’s box office from 8-5 Monday through Friday, 226 North Hackberry, San Antonio TX 78202

Proceeds benefit Clarity Child Guidance Center.

Clarity Child Guidance Center exists to transform the lives of children and families. We are the only nonprofit mental health treatment center specializing in children ages 3-17 in San Antonio and South Texas. Our inpatient and outpatient programs include a range of services including crisis stabilization, psychiatric evaluations, and ongoing therapy. To learn more about Clarity Child Guidance Center or how to help a child in need go to www.ClarityCGC.orgfollow

 

This production is not a presentation of the Carver Community Cultural Center or the Carver Development Board.

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Tracy Echols April 13, 2017 at 7:42 pm

“I think a lot about what we learn as kids from our parents that shapes us into the adults we become and how the things we don’t want to keep are hard to unlearn. I’m also interested in the cycle, how we eventually switch and become the parents, and our parents become the children, if we live long enough.” 🌹Love ❤️

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